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Evidence shows it’s false, but conspiracies still make us wonder

May 21, 2019

Sometimes a line of coincidences concerning significant events in history gets people to stop and think about whether or not something might be more than just a coincidence.

There are many conspiracies, some are more believable and well explained than others, some are just fantasies. It allows people to use their imagination and think differently than others.

By definition, a conspiracy theory is the fear of a nonexistent or alleged conspiracy or the unnecessary assumption of conspiracy when other explanations are more probable. Evidence shows the theories are false, and there is an absence of proof of the conspiracy. These theories are simply just theories, and shouldn’t always be taken seriously.

According to Bigthink.com, there are ten popular conspiracy theories.

The biggest conspiracy theory according to the website is the “Secret Group Controlling World”, which claims that there is a secret group called the Illuminati, that has been controlling the world and are planning to create a one world government.

Conspiracy theorists believe that the end-goal is to create The New World Order, which would dissolve national boundaries and people’s identities.

Graphic by Jasmin Lykke

The conspiracy theory about 9/11

One very popular conspiracy theory is about the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2001.

The theory is that the owner Larry Silverstein had some kind of involvement in the terrorist attack to benefit from the huge insurance policy he took out covering terrorism. Just months before 9/11, the World Trade Center’s lease was sold to Silverstein. He took out an insurance plan that covered terrorism. After 9/11, Silverstein took the insurance company to court, claiming he should be paid double because there were two attacks. He then won the case and was awarded $4.5 billion.

Senior Jacob Puckett shared his opinion on this particular coincidence.

“He must have recognized the possibility of a terrorist attack in the future and coincidently got insurance months before,” he said.

Another coincidence was that Silverstein himself had a last-minute doctor appointment the day of 9/11 and was not in the building.

Fact checking website Snopes.com claimed that workers supposedly benefited from foreknowledge of the event, who called in sick and escaped certain death that day, or investors who profited on United and American Airlines stock when it fell afterward.

“It’s a massive series of coincidences, and it does make sense that he would put an insurance solid focused on terrorism after a minor one, one year before,” freshman Jaime Perez-Orduno said.

It was also claimed that The World Trade Center Building number seven was destroyed by controlled demolition using both fire and explosives. There are suspicious coincidences to indicate that the attack had been an inside job.

However, some still disagree with those ideas. “There is no ground for the conspiracy theory to stand on,” government and history teacher Matthew Haynes said. “I don’t think the owner has anything to do with it, it’s all just a bunch of coincidences.”

There may be many reasons behind the attack’’[ however, according to Puckett, greed may be the root of all of it.

“Aside from conspiracy theorists being conspiracy theorists, the rich are known to be crooked and evil,” Puckett said. “Most people look at the rich as willing to do anything to make a profit, including a terrorist attack.”

Although both students and teachers see these coincidences as just coincidences, would a human being be able to set up or be involved in an activity such as this one, just for money?      

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