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Birth control desires lie in hands of government

The+remaining+percentage+of+birth+control+currently+used+falls+into+other+categories.+These+contraceptives+are+what+was+seen+as+most+common.+These+numbers+come+from+an+article+in+the+Huffington+Post+titled%2C+%E2%80%9CWhat+Women+Don%E2%80%99t+Know+About+Birth+Control+Is+Frightening.%E2%80%9D
The remaining percentage of birth control currently used falls into other categories. These contraceptives are what was seen as most common. These numbers come from an article in the Huffington Post titled, “What Women Don’t Know About Birth Control Is Frightening.”

The remaining percentage of birth control currently used falls into other categories. These contraceptives are what was seen as most common. These numbers come from an article in the Huffington Post titled, “What Women Don’t Know About Birth Control Is Frightening.”

The remaining percentage of birth control currently used falls into other categories. These contraceptives are what was seen as most common. These numbers come from an article in the Huffington Post titled, “What Women Don’t Know About Birth Control Is Frightening.”

Shylah Gisbon, Editor-in-Chief

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Women today are making choices about their bodies…but now their choices on birth control lie in the hands of the government.

Since 1970, women have had the freedom to obtain whatever birth control they prefer, thanks to president Richard Nixon, who signed into law Title X, which gave women choices in birth control. But much like time changes, so do policies.

Today, president Donald Trump is currently on the chase to not only make birth control more expensive, but also make abortion extremely difficult for women. According to USA Today, in an article titled “Trump administration plan means fewer Americans will have access to family planning,” Trump expresses his vision regarding better family planning. Rather than funding organizations to allow women their full accessibility to contraception, it “opens the door to shifting funds to organizations that exclusively provide and educate about abstinence-only and other less effective strategies for family planning.”

Birth control appeals to a wide range of ages, and students have opinions regarding their beliefs on the accessibility of birth control.

“I feel that it should be no man’s choice or for that matter anyone’s choice in the government whether a woman should be allowed to have an abortion or take any form of birth control,” junior Audrey Elliot said.

Along with the understanding that the fate of birth control lies in the hands of the government, students also expressed their opinions on the costs of the procedures.

“Birth control should be covered by insurance like any other medication,” Elliot said. “It would be best if it was free or low cost. Abortion is a medical procedure just like any other. The only reason the there is any opposition is because of religion and religion should have no influence whatsoever in a secular government.”

In another position on the argument, there has been a lack of funding in the ability for women to maintain birth control.

“We don’t wantteenage pregnancy, yet we cut the funding for the place that provides condoms and birth control,” senior Madison Morris said. “I think they [the government] should fund it. They make things hard for young mothers because we are out on programs like WIC [Women, Infants and Children] and Medicaid and if we want to stop early pregnancy, it starts with funding the solutions.”

In these instances, there have been many examples of women becoming pregnant due to their inability to access proper contraception.

According to an article titled “In Developing Nations, 214 Million Women Want to Prevent Pregnancy But Have No Contraception,” from the Slate, “Millions of women who currently rely on reproductive health organizations funded by U.S. aid will lose access to their means of preventing pregnancy.”

According to other students, minors should also have the ability to easily access differing forms of contraceptives.

“I would say minors should have access to birth control just as easily as adults,” senior Rebecca Bailey said. “If a teenage girl wants to take birth control, I don’t understand why anyone would have an issue with that, especially their parents or people who feel very strongly that teen pregnancy is bad.”

In another opinion, any women at any age should have the ability to make decisions over their own bodies.

“Birth control should be easily accessible and low cost,” Elliot said. “Teens will and do have sex, and it should be easy for them to access birth control so that unwanted teen pregnancies don’t happen. Minors still have privacy rights.”

When it comes to the different options of birth control, women have a wide variety of choices.

According to an article provided by Reid Health and Wellness Center, different examples include sterilization, IUD (Intrauterine Device), Non-uterine implant (in the arm), the shot, vaginal ring, pills, patch, and a few others.

Each birth control option comes with its own benefits ranging from being something that won’t bother a woman daily, to being more effective than others.

A common idea regarding birth control is that it leads to different health risks in a woman’s body. Students also shared their opinions on this subject.

“I think it just depends on that person’s body and personal history of different diseases that could affect it,” Morris said. “For example, we have a history of breast and cervical cancer in my family, so my mom was really hesitant. It can have effects like weight gain, acne, hormones or can make periods worse.”

Other students have differing opinions on the health risks.

“I think it really depends on the person taking it,” Bailey said. “Women take birth control for different reasons and each person has a different experience with it. I haven’t personally known anyone who has had any major issues with birth control and everyone I know that has taken it has had a positive experience so I would say any health risks are pretty minor.”

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Birth control desires lie in hands of government